Monday, May 19, 2008

Human Cultural Evolution(?)

Author: Robert Bruce Baird

Human Cultural Evolution:

If we think about it at this juncture, clearly there is little to commend this Judaeo/ Christian/Islamic God if he is represented by the people who led this church. Pagans have a far better history and stand foursquare and 'head and shoulders' above this God of this often re-written Bible. The separation of man from his soul; man from his equal (woman); man from Nature and man from most all that is good; is all I see! Maybe Melchizedek or some other Biblical character (like the Mormon secret society is named after) will be raised up and made a new savior. Maybe it will be John the Baptist (the Johannites and Benjaminites) or it might even be one of the censored people of the Bible like Jasher who will be re-cycled and make it appear they've changed. Whatever it is, I don't want the same structure and would like to see people DOING what Jesus did. Thinking for themselves and communing with his soul 'within' to touch the beauty in all nature!

We can't expect people to read such a totally different picture of history and not challenge our ideas. We are including the best scholars we can and yet there will be many who are so threatened they will say all kinds of bad things about us. We know that there are risks and that the 'powers that be' will not help make this 'stuff' become common knowledge. The Hermetic 'cults' of Egypt and Greece that were so popular when people were allowed to follow knowledge (more) in the early Hellenistic times were from Isis and Osiris. They were the founders of Egypt who were not Gods. Like Moses and Jesus who the rabbis tell us became the object of hero worship so it has often been with great people once they are dead. Priests take the peoples' good opinion of their heroes and turn them into 'cults' with themselves as the key interpreters.

Readers who study hard and have an open mind will find a veritable mine field of 'stuff' to try to sift through in order to find any essence of truth. I see some great truth might exist as I contemplate the naturally growing nanotubes and lattices or helixes that all energy manifests through. The whole universe vibrates according to an intelligent design such as mathematically demonstrated by Dembski. There is no reason to have made Darwin out to be a pure evolutionist. His Theory of Love is just as important. Although he was forced to differentiate himself from Lamarck he was in fact inspired by him. Few enough are the scientists who see there are divergent forces at work in all truthful outcomes. The quality of energy is as important as the quantity of energy, in whatever forces impact mutation. It is not unreasonable to say there is a collective force with purpose in some Divinely Providential construct. It is folly however, to think a mere human might fully comprehend it. That kind of ideology smacks of religious claptrap, I know. Nonetheless I propose there is merit in Dembski and all open-minded evaluations of what might be. We are often seeing the science or present fad therein proclaims an absolute proof that is subsequently proven false. I like the atomic physicists who were called atom-mysticists at first. Neils Bohr was one of them and he observed something like the following: "A great truth has an opposite, which is also true. A trivial truth has an opposite which is only a falsehood."

We have endured the 'experts' of mechanistic professionalism far too long. Their ego has made them cling to fads and fictions with the most ignorant among us. When Edison's phonograph was presented to the Paris Academy of Sciences they throttled the presenter as they claimed he was a ventriloquist. At the end of the 19th Century a Patent Office Official said they should close down because everything that could be discovered had been already patented. This is the kind of sunshine law that all bureaucracies should install but not because they are right about no more inventions being possible. Even worse is the early 20th Century Britannica proclaiming torture was a thing of the past in 'civilized' Europe? Clearly we must do our own thinking.

"Although Darwin was in the habit of repudiating violently any intimation that he had profited from Lamarck, we have already seen that he was acquainted at an early age with English versions of the latter's work and in 1845 there is a reference in an unpublished letter to Lyell (Biblio: In the possession of the American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.) regarding 'my volumes of Lamarck.'" (1)

Lamarckian evolutionary theory allows for the mix of creation and the impact of directed creative and psychic or soulful participation. If God is everything and we all act in concert, there is a powerful collective force to be reckoned with. We might even change the nature of our Noble leaders by holding them in the light. Let us not cling to theory that faith or fad alone limits and selects facts to fit the prevailing 'norm'. Dembski must not be censored and censured by the biologists who fight to maintain their stranglehold on evolutionary theory. Charles Fort and Arthur Koestler are as wise as any who have 'observed' in the last century and they would not encourage such censure, I am sure. Creation should not be laid at the feet of God and we are part of God, we must act responsibly and with right action and thought. Come with me, and bring an open-mind that you can assimilate and later test. I will endeavour to see the 'light' in all its harmonizing glory. Barthold Niebuhr put the adventure in these relevant words:

"He who calls what has vanished back again into being, enjoys a BLISS like that of creating."

Thor Heyerdahl was such a person. His insight changed a lot of academic attitudes as he proved many things held sacred were anything but correct. We need to provide far better reason for a change in opinions than the prevailing paradigm if only because they have such a stranglehold on opinion. The propagandists have many writers and academics at their beck and call. This has been true for many millennia, and they have had the ability to destroy most evidence that would disprove their fictions or myths. That is one reason why linguistics and botany or other forensic tools are the best evidences for our effort to present an alternative history. Even when a 99% archaeological certainty that fits facts and established criteria to keep much truth out of the realm of accepted evidence – such as the Roman statue or head found in Mexico – there are those who debunk it or make it seem unimportant.

My personal knowledge of statues at Chichen Itza convinces me there were many Etruscan and Greek artisans at work in Central America. If you ever go there be sure to drop in on the Villas Archaeologique. As you read Heyerdahl in the following quote be cognizant that five separate forensic labs have concurred that cocaine from Peru was part of the diet the mummies of Egypt enjoyed. Balabanova was well aware of the implications of this upon world history. That is why she had all the other labs test her results. Lanning provides artefacts detailing those involved in this trade. These secrets were very important to the potion makers or pharmacists of the ancient world. Hallucinatory drugs probably started the Phoenicians down this road a long time before Egypt. Our artefacts and evidence on stone and bas-reliefs includes the ancient handshake of the Phoenician enterprise that I think Moses and his family benefited from for a very long time.

"Preconceived opinions on the lack of maritime activity in pre-Spanish America have also affected the botanical discussions of the origin of the common garden bean, 'Phaseolus vulgaris'. Last century Könicke, in a paper on the home of the garden bean, pointed out that this crop plant was formerly generally accepted as having been cultivated in Europe by the ancient Greeks and Romans, under the name of Dolickos, Phaseolus, etc. The cultivation of the same bean among the Aborigines of America was therefore explained as the result of its post-Columbian introduction from the Old World by the early Spaniards. (2) This was the theory until Wittmack discovered in 1880 the common garden bean among the archaeological excavations of Reiss and Stübel at the prehistoric cemetery of Ancon, Peru. (3) It was there found interred as food with mummy burials long antedating the European discovery of America. Here was suddenly ample proof of the pre-European cultivation of 'Phaseolus' in America, and beans were subsequently recovered from pre-Incan sites along the entire coast of Peru. At this time, however, pre-Columbian specimens of the 'European' bean were no longer accessible. The view was taken, therefore, that the Old World 'Phaseolus' must after all have originated in aboriginal 'America', and been carried back thence to Europe by the early Spaniards. (4)

{Some have gone so far as to say that bird droppings are the result of all these plant migration. The Yam or American sweet potato turned the tide for the champion of Euro-centric history in botany and zoology. He had to confess he had been wrong after decades of fighting the point. Why then do we celebrate the SLAVER Columbus? Is it not to maintain a colonial secret of deceit upon which our sovereign nations are founded? The Incans had a style of government that utopian philosophers like Sir Francis Bacon used as the model in writing about possible forms of great government.}

More recently Hutchison, Silow and Stephens pointed out, with corroborative botanical evidence, that the 'Phaseolus' beans represent but one more indication of contact between the Old and New World before Columbus. (5) The same problem concerns varieties of the lima bean, 'Phaseolus lunatus', growing wild in Guatemala and common in the earliest Chimu and Nazca graves of coastal Peru. In 1950 Sauer points to certain very early genetic peculiarities of a race of lima beans of primitive characteristics long under cultivation in parts of Indonesia and Indo-China, and says: 'If, then, south-eastern Asia should prove to be a reservoir of the more primitive lima beans, long since extinct in Peru and Mexico, a further problem of the time and manner of trans-Pacific connection is raised by which the American bean was communicated to the native population across the Pacific.' (6) The same problem is also raised by a related bean, the jackbean, or swordbean, 'Canavalia' sp. Stoner and Anderson have called attention to the following: 'The sword bean ('Canavalia'), widely cultivated throughout the Pacific and always considered to be of Old World origin, is now known from prehistoric sites along the coasts of both South America and Mexico.' (7) 'Canavalia' beans excavated from the stratified deposits at Huaca Prieta on the Pacific coast of Peru, date from between 3000 and 1000 BC. (8) Sauer states that its archaeological distribution and relation to wild species now indicate the jackbean as a New World domesticate. (9)

The above brief survey will show that, not only has anthropological thought for nearly a century been biased by ethno-botanical evidence, but to a quite considerable extent anthropological presuppositions have similarly affected American botany. The literature on the origin and spread of certain American and Pacific island cultigens demonstrates that many botanical assumptions have been based on the conviction that the New World was isolated from the rest of the world prior to the voyage of Columbus. Similarly, it has been taken for granted that only Indonesian craft could move eastwards into the open Pacific, whereas the culture of the South American people was presumably confined to their own coastal waters due to the lack of seaworthy craft. The material reviewed above shows that there is adequate evidence of aboriginal export of American plants into the adjacent part of the Pacific island area… Merrill favours Africa as the original homeland of the gourd, and proposes that it reached America across the Atlantic. (10) If the 13-chromosomed cultivated Old World cotton, together with wild American species, were actually employed in the hybridization of the 26 chromosomed New World cotton species then an overseas introduction from the Old World is by far shorter and easier with the westward drifts across the open Atlantic than against the elements across the six times wider Pacific, where no 13-chromosomed cottons exist. The coconut was relayed straight across the Pacific. If it originated in tropic America where all related genera occur, it must have spread with the earliest Pacific voyagers, since it was present in Indonesia at the beginning of the Christian era. The yam has a similar complete trans-Pacific distribution… the same strong ocean river, sweeping from Mexico straight to the Philippines should be taken into account." (11)

The dyeing industry of Phoenician purple is in Peru as well as Mexico, and it was a critical and valuable export of Tyre. There are heraldic similarities and customs galore which we will continue to show. The purpose of adding these tidbits to all the other ones I have covered in other books is to demonstrate two things. First and foremost (for the purposes of this book), we can see academics and science are frequently wrong. Wrong, and motivated! Secondarily there is the matter of megaliths and henges, Pyramids and dolmen or Round Towers that are all over the World. They are key components of the Neolithic Library system that encompassed all the 'Brotherhood' of man in a spiritual and growth oriented culture of tolerance and egalitarian morals.

NOTES:

1) Darwin's Century, Evolution and the Man Who Discovered It., by Loren Eisely, 1958, Doubleday, 1961, pg. 187. 2) Sea Routes to Polynesia, by Thor Heyerdahl, with editorial notes by Karl Jettmar, Ph.D., Professor of Ethnology, Univ. of Heidelberg, and a foreword by Hans W: son Ahlmann, Ph. D. former President of the International Geographical Union, 1968, Futura Publ., ed., 1974. brings us Könicke (1885, p.136) from pg. 73. 3) Ibid, Wittmack, (1880, p.176). 4) Ibid, Wittmack, (1886, 1888) 5) Ibid, Hutchinson, Silow and Stephens (1947, pg.138). 6) Ibid, Sauer (1950, p.502). 7) Ibid, Stoner and Anderson, (1949, p.392). 8) Ibid, Whitaker and Bird (1949, pg.2.). 9) Ibid, Sauer (1950, pg.499). 10) Ibid, Merrill (1950, pp.9-10). 11) Ibid, pgs. 73-76.

About the author: Columnist for The ES Press Magazine Author of Diverse Druids World-Mysteries.com guest writer Newagetravel.com

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